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Getenergy America 2016 Programme – 18th October
08:00 - 09:00

Registration Opens for Getenergy VTEC Americas 2016

09:00 - 09:05

Welcome speech from Enrique Graue Wiechers, Rector of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

09:10 - 09:45

OPENING SUMMIT – Creating a localised business model in Mexico and the Americas

The current price constrained environment has been and will continue to be a catalyst for change in the oil and gas industry. It is no longer cost efficient to hire expatriate staff or rely on international supply chains; now more than ever, it is imperative that companies employ a localised business model, underpinned by an investment in education, supply chain development and workforce safety.

As an example, a recent SENER report highlighted that Mexico would need 135,000 people to enter the industry in the coming years to meet the demand of the newly opened market. In order that Mexico and its people can benefit to the greatest extent from the growth of its hydrocarbon industry, it is vital that local content is developed in both the workforce and supply chain.

Colombia’s oil and gas industry has expanded considerably in recent years and now represents 19% of national income. The Colombian government is currently seeking to continue this growth through innovative measures to gain investment in offshore and unconventional production. Colombia’s goals hinge on attracting and developing nationals to work in the industry.

This opening session highlights how government, industry and education can collaborate to enable a localised approach to oil and gas projects.

Location: Patio de la Auntonomía

Invited Speakers:

Jose Antonio Gonzalez Anaya, CEO, PEMEX

Aurelio Nuno Mayer, Minister of Education, SEP

Facilitator:

Phil Andrews, CEO, Getenergy Field Ready

09:55

Stream A – DEVELOPING CAPACITY IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING

10:00 - 11:00

Mexican government strategies for education and training in the oil and gas industry

This session will bring together top level representatives from Mexican government ministries to highlight the perceived challenges to developing education and workforce capacity in Mexico and will discuss government led approaches to overcoming these.
Specifically, we will look at:
• What strategies are in place to increase capacity within the Mexican education system?
• How can the Government support the international oil sector in advancing the national oil and gas workforce?
• Estimating the numbers – we look at where exactly capacity development is required.
• The need for research capacity development and where exactly the gaps in research are.

Facilitator:

Jim Playfoot, Managing Director, Getenergy Intelligence

Location: Patio de la Auntonomía

11:00 - 12:00

Networking Coffee in the Learning Arena

12:00 - 13:00

Creating a Skills Development Framework for the Hydrocarbons sector

Measuring the labour requirements of a growing hydrocarbons sector is an important step in assessing what needs to be done to advance the industry. This session will look at how SENER is working with Robert Gordon University and other institution to create a skills development framework for Mexico and assess exactly what the industry requires.

The framework is intended to define the capabilities pertinent to those working within the oil and gas sector in Mexico with a high level of descriptive analysis into the behaviours, skills and knowledge that underpin effective performance.

Facilitator:

Jack Pegram, Managing Director, Getenergy Events

Location: Patio de la Auntonomía

 

  • Carlos Ortiz Gomez Director General for Research and Talent Development - SENER
  • Paul de Leeuw Director of RGU’s Oil and Gas Institute - Robert Gordon University
13:00 - 14:30

Networking Lunch in the Learning Arena

14:30 - 15:30

Education, training and supply chain investment commitments, with ANH, ANP & CNH

A commitment to invest in education and training plays an important role in the assigning of contracts and exploration blocks by government agencies. This session will seek to explore how these three major institutions value investment commitments as part of the overall formula for awarding contracts.

For example, in Mexico, the CNH formula is weighted heavily towards the proportion of pre-tax profits that will be shared with the government with the remainder concerned with proposed investment commitments.

To ensure, maximum benefit to the local economy, companies must deliver jobs in the oil and gas workforce and supply chain, all of this is underpinned by a commitment to education and skills developments.

Facilitator:

Phil Andrews, CEO, Getenergy Field Ready

Location: Patio de la Autonomía

15:30 - 16:15

Networking Coffee in the Learning Arena

16:15 - 17:15

Assessing the perceived risks for IOCs in investing in a localised oil and gas industry

In the past, IOCs have been perceived as acting as a foreign player in host countries, employing expatriate staff and not engaging with local supply chains. The constrained price environment has been a catalyst for the adoption of a more localised business model for the industry.

In Mexico, there are 172 universities that offer petroleum engineering as a degree. This highlights one of the main challenges for the IOC community, which is developing an understanding of which academic institutions are providing the most valuable education to the next generation of oil and gas workers. This session will look at the perceived risks and challenges for localising the oil and gas industry in the Americas. Local standards, ELT and safety are commonly cited as the most prominent perceived risk, and will all be discussed by our senior panel of IOCs.

Facilitator:

Ken Graham, Senior Advisor, Rowhill Consulting Group

Location: Patio de la Auntonomía
.

18:30

Networking reception hosted by the British Embassy in Mexico and UKTI

Location: Palacio de Minería - Salón Bicentenario

09:55

Stream B – IMPLEMENTABLE STRATEGIES FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

10:00 - 11:00

Programmes for developing technical excellence

This session will bring together representatives from Penspen and operating companies to discuss their approaches to developing technically competent individuals for the oil and gas industry.

In growth industries such as Mexico and Colombia, it is imperative that operators and service companies can rely on a sustainable source of new talent.

We will hear how Penspen have been supporting further education and expertise through a post graduate diploma programme with UJAT (Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco).

Facilitator:

Ken Graham, Senior Advisor, Rowhill Consulting Group

Location: Salón Bicentenario

 

11:00 - 12:00

Networking Coffee in the Learning Arena

12:00 - 13:00

Embedding a strong safety culture within the technical workforce

Although the oil and gas industry is an inherently hazardous sector, most work-related injuries are preventable. Safety needs to be at the heart of all operations and creating a culture of safety must be an integral part of any training. In the USA, fatality rates in the oil and gas industry are seven times higher than the average among other sectors. High Reliability Organisations carry a greater level of risk and there is a requirement for more rigorous and advanced safety training to ensure disasters like that of the Deepwater Horizon and Texas City Oil Refinery can be avoided.

Health and safety training will be a hugely important component in building local capacity across the Americas. HSE has not traditionally been well governed, but this is something that the industry is addressing through more rigorous competency programmes. This session will look at safety training as an integrated part of competency programmes and how companies are embedding a culture of safety within the workforce.

Invited Speakers:

Senior Representative, Pemex

Facilitator:

Dave Masson, Former VP Upstream Development Growth, Business and Joint Ventures, Shell

Location: Salón Bicentenario
.

13:00 - 14:30

Networking Lunch in the Learning Arena

14:30 - 15:30

The role of education and training providers in increasing operator efficiency and productivity

The prolonged low oil price is driving our industry to achieve greater levels of competency and workforce productivity in order to reduce risk, increase efficiency and cut costs. Companies need to set competency profile expected job roles to ensure that they are achievable and sustainable. The industry needs competency standards that can be adhered to (NVQ/SVQ, OPITO, etc) and a system set-up to manage them.

This session will look at how the private training community has and is adjusting to the changing demands of the oil and gas industry and will assess the role that these companies can play in developing workforce capacity across the Americas.

For example, the reduced size of workforces has prescribed a greater degree of cross-discipline training and the ability to spread competencies. Employing less people with more developed skills sets allows the company to be equally or more efficient with fewer employees. This is a theme we look to explore in this session.

 

Facilitator:

Jim Sheegog, Owner, Rowhill Consulting Group

Location: Salón Bicentenario

15:30 - 16:15

Networking Coffee in the Learning Arena

16:15 - 17:15

Developing international university partnerships

A common theme across the Americas, is the need to develop local education institutions through international academic partnerships with institutions in mature hydrocarbon producing countries, this approach is very much true in Colombia and Mexico.

The University of Western Australia and the University of Calgary have partnered with other academic institutions in less mature hydrocarbon producing nations in order to share their experience and expertise. These academic institutions will explain the role they have had in developing capacity for local academic institutions across the world.

In this session, we will explore opportunities for international universities to develop partnerships with local institutions in the growth markets of Latin America.

Facilitator:

Jim Playfoot, Managing Director, Getenergy Intelligence

Location: Salón Bicentenario

  • Prof. Zachary Aman Professor Mechanical and Chemical Engineering - University of Western Australia
  • Nicolás Santos Santos Director of the School of Petroleum Engineering - Universidad Industrial de Santander - invited